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POSTED NAME CITY EMAIL WEBSITE
Sep 14, 06 Tim Forker Brooklyn, NY
 
I remember sometime in 1974 a friend's older brother told us that KWFM
was THE station to listen to, so we did.  I never stopped until I left
Tucson in 1980, but it was one of the things that got me through high
school.  I recall a hilarious pre-concert interview sometime in there
with Frank Zappa (1978?) -- anyway to hear that again?  The station was
better than buying records.
Dec 29, 08 Terry Morton Chicago
 
I grew up in Tucson and in my early years, my station of choice was
KTKT. When Kdub came around, I spent quite some time trying to get an
FM setup in my bedroom in the foothills. When I did, my world changed
and I became engaged in music and new sounds that still engage me
today. I'll always remember placing the white sticker with the yellow
sun all over my parent's house and my Dad going nuts.

I was extremely disappointed when Kdub disappeared in a format change
and I still know the disappointment I had back then. I have since moved
away from Tucson and have been exposed to bigger cities and the radio
they offer, but outside of WXRT here in Chicago, nothing really comes
close. Even XRT doesn't fill the bill, but I know how strongly
listeners in Chicago have felt about this station and I understand. It
just isn't enough for me. As time goes on, I find that I really
appreciate the past and this website is a fine reminder of how
important the past can be. I still remember absolute shock over the
senselessness of Bob Cooke's death. But my other memories are equally
as strong and they remind me of a Tucson I no longer see when I'm
there.

When I visit Tucson today, which I do yearly, I seek out a station that
might take me back, but one never does. Kdub will never be replaced but
if I take time and think back, I can't quite feel those days, but their
presence in me is unmistakable. Thank you for the website and the
jogging of memories.
May 16, 12 Tom Metz (yes! that's right!...L'il Tommy Metz Oceanside, Calif haven't go one
 
Geez Louise!!! They just cannot make a Radio Station like KWFM was in
the 70's-some of the 80's.  Bob Cooke was the Greatest!!!!  We had alot
great AM conversation. R.I.P. Mon Ami!!!
Lived in San Francisco in the mid 80's to mid 90's KFOG was like KWFM
but couldn't and never could be like FM in the 70's.
I live in Coastal North County San Diego and we have a cool local
Station called Sets 102,  But I like my music via satellite. Too bad we
cannot "beam" all the Greatness of the 1970's KWFM into  Space and back
to Earth. It's the Back to Earth that hards!!! Thanks to whoever put
this together!!!  My Brother Jim was in a few of those great bands we
had around town back then!!! Adios Muchachos~ Tomas
Nov 10, 10 Toney Brooks Salina, KS (I know, I know!)
 
My Sandusky predecessor made the deal to buy KWFM from Alvin Korngold. 
I was lukewarm to cold on the acquisition for a number of reasons, not
the least of which was that I thought we had agreed to pay too much for
the station.  The ratings had slumped.

Dudley White, Sandusky's chairman, told me bluntly and impatiently one
day that I had to **** or put my pants back on.

So we informed Mr. Korngold that there had been material adverse change
at KW, contract jargon usually reserved for Acts of God, and would not
consummate the deal.  So we renegotiated and saved a million bucks.

In 1982, only 4 AOR radio stations in the country ranked #1 overall in
their respective markets: KBPI, KDKB, KWFM and WMMS in Cleveland.  That
accomplishment, one of many, is a sterling tribute to Jim Hardy, Jim Ray
Cobb, Lee Dombrowski and the entire team of All-Stars that staffed,
loved and continue to love KWFM.

I and Sandusky were fortunate to have played a part in the station's
rich history and tradition of excellence.
Oct 6, 10 Casey Townsend Tucson
 
In 1981 or 82 KWFM partnered with the U of A Flandrau Planetarium to
present "Cosmic Radiance" the first locally produced full-featured
laser light show ever done there. 

The show opening was a panorama of the Tucson skyline with an orange
setting sun, under which the KWFM logo letters faded in. The sun set as
the panorama faded out and then the letters faded out as the music
started. 

I remember going to the KWFM studios every week with an arm-load of LPs
to trade for the LPs for the featured artist for that week's show. We
mixed the show in a small studio in a converted closet covered in
carpet by the planetarium loading dock then took the tape into the
theater to add the visual effects.

I can still see the images from 'Dark Side of the Moon' in my minds
eye. (We certainly played that show a lot!) One of the best points of
my life.

Thanks for this web site's trip down memory lane.
Feb 17, 05 Teresa Peterman Tucson, Arizona
 
Hello!

I am the "little sister" that Christy Price referred to in here in the
guest book. 

I wanted to thank you for this very cool web site.  I have had such a
great time listening to the "tune in" portion.   I am just going nuts
over this one.  Takes me back listening to the lost and found animals
and all the great Audio Emporium commercials.  We truly were two of the
most loyal fans and we were so sad when it ended.  Tucson radio has
never been the same.

I just did want to share with you... I found the actual album "Meet
Mississippi Charles Bevel" through Craig Moerer Records By Mail.  I
just received it the other day.  Now, I am totally in heaven.

I also found the original (long) version of Little River Band "It's a
Long Way There" on that site.  Of course, these are not out on CD's --
only vinyl.  Which is totally cool.

All my findings were thanks to your web site.  Looking through the play
lists really helped jog my memory of tunes I had nearly forgotton.  When
I started this mission, I knew I wanted "overheard" by Mississippi
Charles Bevel, however, I had no idea what the name of the album was or
that it was made by A & M--- so, with thanks to your web site, and me
doing more digging...after many years... I FOUND IT.  

You may want to sometime check out that Craig Moerer Records By Mail
web site, they have some very hard to find vinyl.  They may even have
another copy of the "Bevel" :)
 
Just wanted to say "thanks" and share my findings.
 
Sincerely,
Teresa Peterman
Long time fan of KWFM and native Tucsonan
Jun 20, 05 Tamara Thomas Wickenburg
 
I lived in Tucson from 80 to 95.  KWFM was the only thing I listened to.
 What a treat to stumble on your site!

I was actually trying to find any surviving recordings of Street
Pajama.  Anybody know where I can get any or all of their three
albums??

Thanks! And keep on rockin!
Feb 15, 11 Tony Van Note The Hudson Valley New York
 
What a blast it is to find this site. We moved to Tucson in 1978 and I
soon started working with Fred, Roger and Bill Cashman at Westwood to
put together a new band for the up and coming Street Pajama. I booked
and did sound for what I thought where the best years. Those gig's at
Tequila Mockingbird very cool. I have just spent most of the afternoon
listing to the Central Air Session that was recorded at Westwood for
KWFM. I happened to be in the studio that night. What a great band.
Cherie and I will be in Tucson in a couple of weeks, would be great to
see some of those folks.
Nov 8, 04 Tim Walters Wasilla, AK
 
Ahh...Tucson.  I can still remember listening to the great tunes in
Sabino Canyon with the smell of the creosote bushes in full bloom, and
a beer.  Love those days.  Thanks for the walk down memory lane.  Are
there any stations taking the place of this cultural icon?
Jun 17, 10 Tod Decker Scottsdale
 
I grew up on KWFM ..... Nothing like growing up at the base of the Santa
Catalinas with the warm winds blowin' and Steely Dan, Bad Company and
Santana pumpin' thru on the old Kenwood.  Beautiful .....
Oct 24, 06 Jan Aufschneider Panama City Beach, Florida
 
I just happened upon alot of familiar names looking at your web site. We
lived in Tucson from 1972-1984.  I managed Creations on 4th ave. from
around 1973-1979 and Larry Sotosanti was my ad salesman. I knew Bob
Cooke, John Shook and alot of other people at KWFM.  What struck me
while reading some of the entries was the entry from Laura (Lau) Cooke.
That time was something that will never be erased from mine and my
husband Mike's memeory.  Thanks for the memories.
Oct 26, 15 George Hutchison Sequim, WA www.rtty.com
 
Looking for Gene/Bill Thayer. Back in my Navy days I was a submarine
sailor stationed in Honolulu, and was the "Ship's Entertainment Petty
Officer".

KPOI was very generous in that they allowed me use of their library and
recording facilities in order to make music tapes for the submarine's
crew music system.

While making a tape one night I encountered Gene Thayer, one of the
"Popular" ones, who allowed me to make copies of some Halloween class
Spooky Tapes made by Gene and Michael Guinn, another KPOI Jock.

Several years ago I found the tapes in my collection of Navy Days
Stuff, and took the time to do some editing and splicing and what have
you and laid the tapes to CD. I wonder if Mr. Thayer or Mr. Guinn would
be interested in a copy of the CD?

The names of the stories are "How I Found Count Dracula" and "The
Monster's Thoughts".

They are both excellent examples of classic radio drama production
work, with cool sound effects and piles of tongue in cheek humor.

Should anyone know them or their whereabouts, please have them contact
me. Halloween is about upon us and I think they would relish some of
their younger days efforts.

Thanks in advance to anyone who could clue them in and/or contact me
via e-mail, and we can go from there.

E-mail is w7tty@centurylink.net

Regards to all,

George Hutchison - Sequim, Washington
Jul 14, 05 Jerry Fontes Chatham, New Jersey
 
I remember KWFM as a listener.  I remember how its DJ personalities
molded my and others' exposure and our taste of Rock n' Roll music
while coming of age as a teenager in the late 1970's.  KWFM was an
integral part of the freshman student experience at The University of
Arizona in the late summer of 1978.  Everything felt so new including
what emanated from the stereo speakers in our dormitories, the
fraternity houses and apartment dwellings.

Was it Tucson's "Golden Age of Radio"?  I believe that it was.  KWFM
was one of Tucson's first tenants on the mysterious FM dial, a frontier
that demanded the eclectic and creative.  In the fall of 1978,  KWFM was
voted the 9th best radio station in the country by Rolling Stone
magazine.  KWFM comforted us through the deaths of Keith Moon and John
Lennon.  It introduced Tucson listeners to "Punk" and "New Wave". 
Before cable and before all night local television, KWFM was our
overnight sentinel.

How can one relive the entire KWFM 70's and early 80's?  We must build
a spaceship that can travel faster than radio transmissions.  We must
catch up to all those fleeting signals of the music and the warm voices
in between.


"I like to dream yes, yes, right between my sound machine
On a cloud of sound I drift in the night 
Any place it goes is right 
Goes far, flies near, to the stars away from here"